Boeing 747-400 General
Aircraft
Boeing 747-400
Type
Long range widebody aircraft
Crew
2
Unit Cost
US$ 228.0 - 260.0 million
Launch Customer
Northwest Airlines
Status
In Operation

Boeing 747-400 Program Milestones
First order
October 22, 1985
First roll out
January 26, 1988
First flight
April 29, 1988
Certification
January 10, 1989
First delivery
January 26, 1989
In service
February 9, 1989
by
Northwest Airlines


Boeing 747-400 Dimensions
Cross Section
21 feet 4 inch (6,50 m)
Wing Span
213 feet (64,92 m)
Stabilo Span
72 feet 9 inch (22,17 m)
Length
225 feet 2 inch (68,63 m)
Height
64 feet (19,51 m)
Click here to see the Boeing 747-400 Dimensions

Boeing 747-400 Weights

GE CF6-80C2B1F Engines
Baseline Airplane
Maximum Taxi Weight
877.000 lbs
Max Take-off Weight
875.000 lbs
Max Landing Weight
630.000 lbs
Max Zero Fuel Weight
542.500 lbs
Operating Empty Weight
394.088 lbs
Max Structural Payload
148.412 lbs
Max Cargo containers
5.536 Cubic feet
Max Cargo bulk
835 Cubic feet
Usable Fuel
382.336 lbs

P&W PW4056 Engines
Baseline Airplane
Maximum Taxi Weight
877.000 lbs
Max Take-off Weight
875.000 lbs
Max Landing Weight
630.000 lbs
Max Zero Fuel Weight
542.500 lbs
Operating Empty Weight
394.660 lbs
Max Structural Payload
147.840 lbs
Max Cargo containers
5.536 Cubic feet
Max Cargo bulk
835 Cubic feet
Usable Fuel
383.810 lbs

RR RB211-52462 Engines
Baseline Airplane
Maximum Taxi Weight
877.000 lbs
Max Take-off Weight
875.000 lbs
Max Landing Weight
630.000 lbs
Max Zero Fuel Weight
545.000 lbs
Operating Empty Weight
396.284 lbs
Max Structural Payload
148.716 lbs
Max Cargo containers
5.536 Cubic feet
Max Cargo bulk
835 Cubic feet
Usable Fuel
383.810 lbs

Boeing 747-400 Seating

One Class
628 Passengers
Mixed Class
400 Passengers

Boeing 747-400 Range
7.260 nm (13.450 km)

Prices all variants ($ in Millions)
Boeing 747-400/-400ER
216.0 - 247,5
Boeing 747-400/-400ER
219.5 - 247.0


All Boeing 747 variants
Boeing 747-100
Boeing 747-300
Boeing 747-400ER Freighter

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Boeing 747-400
Except from the Boeing 747-8, the Boeing 747-400 is the latest version of the succesful Boeing 747 series. For many years, the 747 was the largest commercial airliner in the world, a title that is taken over by the Airbus A380. Overall, the -400 series is the best selling and as one would expect, the most advanced version of the 747 family. As already mentioned earlier, the -400 is likely to be replaced by the even more advanced Boeing 747-8 airliner, expected to enter service in 2009.

The Boeing 747-400 or "Queen of the Skies", is one of the leading aircraft in its class for more than 35 years. Besides being the largest aircraft, untill the A380 entered service, it is one of the most versatile aircraft in use today. It is both succesfull carrying passengers as well as cargo. Up to now, over 700 Boeing 747-400 aircraft have been ordered by customers worldwide which indicates its popularity among airlines. The Boeing 747-400 can accomodate up to 400 passengers in a typical three class configuration and fly them up to 7.260 nm (13.450 km) meaning the lowest cost per seat-mile of any twin-aisle airplane in service today.

China Airlines Boeing 747-400 taking off from runway 24...
Singapore Airlines Boeing 747-400F taxiing in...
Boeing 747-400 flightdeck
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Boeing 747-400 Design
The design of the Boeing 747-400 was announced by the Boeing Company in October 1985. It would be a more advanced derivative of the 747-300 which featured 6 feet wing tip extensions in order to improve aerodynamics, an all-new glass cockpit without the need for a flight engineer, advanced and more fuel efficient engines, tail fuel tanks, new cabin interiors, improved wing/fuselage fairings and high-tech in-flight entertainment (IFE). Just like the -300 series, the 747-400 included a SUD (Stretched Upper Deck) as a standard feature. The SUD is almost twice as long as the regular upper deck seen on many older generation 747 and improves aerodynamics to a great extent. Although the wingspan increased by 6 feet, total weight of the wings reduced due to the use of composites and aluminum alloys.

China Airlines Boeing 747-400 taking off from runway 24...
Singapore Airlines Boeing 747-400F taxiing in...
Boeing 747-400 flightdeck
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In January 1988, the first aircraft left the factory and flew three months later on April 29, 1988. The aircraft was certified approximately a year later on January 10, 1989 with PW4000 engines. On May 18, 1989 it was certified with CF6-80C2 engines and June 8, 1989 marked the certification of the aircraft operating with RB211-524G engines. The first aircraft was then delivered to Northwest Airlines in January 1989 with entry in service roughly one month later.

Boeing 747-400 Versions

Boeing 747-400
 
The Boeing 747-400 is, as already pointed out earlier, an improved version of the older Boeing 747-300. It features an increased wingspan, winglets, advanced flightdeck, more fuel-efficient engines and an environment were there is no need for a flight engineer. Just like the -300, it features a Stretched Upper Deck. The 747-400 is no longer produced as production ended officially on March 15, 2007.
 
Boeing 747-400F
 
The Boeing 747-400F is an all freight version which is based on the fuselage design of the 747-200F. It first flew on May 4, 1993 and entered service with Cargolux on November 7 that same year. The -400F is already in use with many freight operators worldwide and can be distinguished from the regular passenger version by its shorter upper-deck hump.
 
Boeing 747-400M
 
The Boeing 747-400M is version which has the ability to carry both passengers and freight in a so-called combi configuration. It entered service with KLM on September 12, 1989 and can be distinguished from regular, all-passenger, models by the large cargo door fitted to the rear of the fuselage.
 
Boeing 747-400D
 
The 747-400D incorporates a high density seating specially designed for short-haul domestic Japanese flights. with this configuration, the aircraft is capable of carrying 568 passengers in a 3-class configuration or 660 passengers in an all economy config. Compared to the regular -400 model, -400D lacks the wing tip extensions and winglets which allowing for an increased number of takeoffs and landings by lowering wing stresses. On short routes the benefit of winglets would be minimal and therfore unnecessary on these aircraft. The Boeing 747-400D first flew on March 18, 1991 and entered service with Japan Airlines on October 22, 1991.
 
Boeing 747-400ER
 
The Boeing 747-400ER (Extended Range) was launched on November 28, 2000 after Qantas ordered 6 of the type. The 747-400ER can fly 805 km farther than the original design or carry 6.800 kg more payload. The first aircraft was delivered to Qantas on October 31, 2002.
 
Boeing 747-400ERF
 
The Boeing 747-400ERF (Extended Range Freighter) is the freight version of the -400ER version and was launched on April 30, 2001 with the first delivery following one and half years later on October 17, 2002 to Air France. Compared to the 747-400, the -400ERF can carry an additional 22.000 pounds of payload with a maximum range of 9.200 km, which is about 525 km farther than most other 747-400 freighter aircraft. In order to carry the additional payload, the aircraft has a strengthened fuselage, landing gear (including larger tires) and wing construction.
 
Boeing 747-400BCF
 
The Boeing 747-400BCF (Boeing Converted Freighter), also known as the Boeing 747-400SF (Special Freighter), is part of a conversion program for standard Boeing 747-400s. The project was launched in 2004 and the first aircraft redelivered to Cathay Pacific entered service again on December 19, 2005.
 
Boeing 747-400LCF
 
The Boeing 747-400LCF (Large Cargo Freighter) program was launched in October 2003 for shipping large parts of its new Boeing 787 aircraft. Pre-owned 747-400 aircraft are converted into a incredibly large freighter, called the LCF, in order to ferry assemblies to its Everett plant for final assembly. There will be a total of three aircraft converted which are previously purchased from China Airlines. The LCF version of the Boeing 747 is not a Boeing production model and can not be purchased by any other customers.


EVA Air Boeing 747-400 arriving at runway 24 (EHAM)
JAL Boeing 747-400BCF climbing out
KLM Boeing 747-400 taking off
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KLM Cargo Boeing 747-400
KLM Cargo Boeing 747-400
Singapore Airlines Boeing 747-400
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