Boeing 777-200ER
 

Boeing 777-200ER General
Aircraft
Boeing 777-200ER
Type
Long range widebody airliner
Crew
2
Unit Cost
US$ 228.0 - 260.0 million
Launch Customer
United Kingdom British Airways
Status
In Operation

Boeing 777-200ER Program Milestones
Major assembly begin
February 20, 1996
Roll-out
September 3, 1996
First flight
October 7, 1996
Delivery
February 6, 1997
First airline
British Airways
First commercial flight
February 9, 1997


Boeing 777-200ER Aircraft Dimensions
Cross Section
20 feet 4 inch (6,2 m)
Wing Span
199 feet 11 inch (60,9 m)
Stabilo Span
70 feet 7,5 inch (21,53 m)
Length
209 feet 1 inch (63,7 m)
Height
60 feet 9 inch (18,5 m)

McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom
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McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom

Boeing 777-200ER Weights

GE Engines
Baseline
HGW Version
Maximum Taxi Weight
537.000 lb
634.500 lb
Max Take-off Weight
535.000 lb
632.500 lb
Max Landing Weight
445.000 lb
460.000 lb
Max Zero Fuel Weight
420.000 lb
430.000 lb
Operating Empty Weight
299.500 lb
304.500 lb
Max Structural Payload
120.450 lb
125.550 lb
Max Cargo (Cubic feet)
5.656
5.656
Usable Fuel
207.700 lb
302.270 lb

P&W Engines
Baseline
HGW Version
Maximum Taxi Weight
537.000 lb
634.500 lb
Max Take-off Weight
535.000 lb
632.500 lb
Max Landing Weight
445.000 lb
460.000 lb
Max Zero Fuel Weight
420.000 lb
430.000 lb
Operating Empty Weight
297.250 lb
302.200 lb
Max Structural Payload
122.750 lb
127.800 lb
Max Cargo (Cubic feet)
5.656
5.656
Usable Fuel
207.700 lb
302.270 lb

RR Engines
Baseline
HGW Version
Maximum Taxi Weight
537.000 lb
634.500 lb
Max Take-off Weight
535.000 lb
632.500 lb
Max Landing Weight
445.000 lb
460.000 lb
Max Zero Fuel Weight
420.000 lb
430.000 lb
Operating Empty Weight
294.050 lb
299.000 lb
Max Structural Payload
125.950 lb
131.000 lb
Max Cargo (Cubic feet)
5.656
5.656
Usable Fuel
207.700 lbs
302.270 lb
Click here to download a Boeing 777 Loadsheet

Boeing 777-200ER Seating
Boeing 777-200ER all economy configuration
Boeing 777-200ER three class long range configuration
One Class
440 Passengers
Mixed Class
301 Passengers

Boeing 777-200ER Powerplants
Pratt & Whitney
PW 4090
90.000 lbs
Rolce Royce
Trent 895
93.400 lbs
General Electric
GE 90-94B
93.700 lbs

Boeing 777-200ER Range
7,730 nautical miles (14,316 km)

Prices all variants - ($ in Millions)
178,0 - 195,0
190,0 - 212,5
219,0 - 243,0
210,0 - 234,0
237,0 - 264,5
Boeing 777 Freighter
232,5 - 240,0

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A United Airlines Boeing 777-200ER climbs out after take-off
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Cockpit of a Boeing 777-200ER
The powerful engines of the Boeing 777-200ER while producing full thrust
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A KLM Boeing 777-200ER performes a powerful take-off
A SIA Boeing 777-200ER climbs out rapidly after take-off
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A Continental Boeing 777-200ER taxies in after a flight from Houston.

Boeing 777-200ER
The Boeing 777 was the first aircraft ever to be fully digitally designed using three-dimensional computer graphics. Using this method eliminated the need for costly mock-ups and test equipment. The Boeing 777 program was launched in October 1990 with an order from United Airlines. Work on the Boeing 777-200(ER) commenced 6 years later in 1996 with the roll-out following later that year. Almost 5 years later, United Airlines flew its first revenue service.
Structure
Landing Gear
Flight Deck
Flight Controls
Engines
Interior
777 Versions

The Boeing 777-200ER, originally known as the Boeing 777-200IGW (Increased Gross Weight), was designed especially for the longer-range B market (5.800 to 7.700 nautical miles) and compared to the basic -200 model it features increased fuel capacity together with an increase in Maximum Take-off Weight to make up for range capability between 6.100 and 7.700 nautical miles. In February 1997, the first Boeing 777-200ER was delivered to launch customer British Airways. As can been seen in the table on the left, the 777-200ER can be powered by several engines. Every operator has the option to select either Pratt & Whitney, Rolce Royce or General Electric manufactured powerplants with each differing in engine thrust. Air France was the first airline to take delivery of a -200ER powered by GE90-94B engines capable of producing 94.000 lbf of thrust. Worldwide the Rolce Royce Trent 800 is the leading engine for the 777 as its market share on this particular airframe is well over 40 percent. Although the engine is used on the majority of 777-200s, it is not available for the 777-200LR and -300ER.

On April 2 1997, a Malaysian Airlines Boeing 777-200ER set a world record by flying a total distance of 20.044 km from Boeing Field, Seattle to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia without landing. The flight was completed in 21 hours and 23 minutes. As it was a non-revenue flight there were no passengers or any other payload on board the aircraft. Besides this, the airplane is known for its longest ETOPS-related emergency flight diversion conducted by a United Airlines Boeing 777-200ER while flying over the Southern Pacific with approximately 255 passengers onboard on March 17, 2003.

Compared to other 777 models, the 777-200ER is the best selling model so far, with over 420 aircraft already sold. It faces direct competition from the Airbus A340-500 and the future Airbus A350-900.

A colorful Boeing 777-200ER about to land on 06
Boeing 777-200ER flight deck
A KLM Boeing 777-200ER shot from upclose as it taxies in
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Boeing 777-200ER Design
The Boeing 777 is one of the most technically advanced aircraft in use today. In fact, it is the largest twinjet aircraft able to carry between 301 and 368 passengers in a three class configuration over a distance of 9.000 nautical miles. Some distinguised features of the 777 are its six wheels on each main landing gear, circular fuselage cross section, blade-like tail cone and its giant size engines which are the biggest used in commercial aviation. With the design of the 777, Boeing employed advanced technologies which include a fly-by-wire flight control system, Electronic Flight Bag (EFB), fiber optic avionics network, LCD glass cockpit flight displays (Honeywell), the most powerful turbofan engines on a commercial aircraft and, as stated earlier, the distinctive six-wheel main landing gear. Another option that was offered by Boeing were folding wingtips and was meant to appeal to airlines who would wish to utilize their aircraft in gates made to accomodate smaller sized aircraft. Untill today, no airline has actually purchased this option.
 
Structure

The progress that has been made in the development and fabrication of advanced composite materials is evident in the Boeing 777. Composites of carbon and toughened resin is used in the skins fo the tailplane, fin torsion boxes and cabin floor beams. Other composite applications include those on secondary structures such as aerodynamic fairings. In fact, composites, including resins and adhesives, account for 9 per cent of the 777's structural weight, compared to some 3 per cent on other Boeing aircraft.

The wings on the Boeing 777 are seen as one of the most aerodynamically efficient airfoils ever developed for a subsonic commercial airliner. The more advanced wing, which is a further refinement of desigs introduced on the Boeing 757 and 767, enhances the airplane's ability to achieve higer cruise speeds, climb faster and cruise at higher altitudes than competing airliners. Furthermore, the entire fuel volume is accomodated within the wings and its structural center section. Overal fuel capacity ranges from 31,000 gallons (117,335 litres) for the 777-200 to 53,440 gallons (202,287 litres) for the 777-200LR.

 
Landing Gear
The main landing gear for the 777 is in a standard two-post arrangement but features six-wheel trucks, instead of the conventional four-wheel units. This is done in order to distribute the weight of the aircraft more evenly on runways and taxi areas, and avoid the need for a supplemental two-wheel gear under the center of the fuselage, as is the case with the MD-11 and DC-10 models.
 
Flight Deck
The layout of the 777 flight deck is in a horizontal format similar to that of the 747-400. Principal flight, navigation and engine information is presented on six large display screens which incorporate advanced liquid-crystal display technology. Besides the Primary Flight Display and Navigation Display, the flight deck of the 777 is fitted with three multipurpose control display units (CDUs), installed in the center aisle stand, providing data display and entry capabilities for flight management functions. In fact, these CDUs are the primary interface with an integrated Airplane Information Management System (AIMS). AIMS provides flight and maintenance crews all pertinent information concerning the overall condition of the airplane, its maintenance requirements and its key operating functions, including flight, thurst and communications management.
 

Flight Controls

The 777 is Boeing's first airliner fitted with a fly-by-wire system, which is fully powered by control surface actuators electrically signalled from the full FBW system. Unlike Airbus, Boeing decided to retain conventional control yokes rather than a side-stick. Boeing's vision was that control yokes were more intuitive for pilots. In addition, the normal control columns and rudder pedals are back-driven by the system to give the pilots direct appreciation of the activity of the automatic system.
 
Interior
The cabin of the 777 is fitted with the so-called Boeing Signature Interior which has since been used on other aircraft like the Boeing 767-400ER, 747-400ER, 737NG (partly) and 757 (partly). Furthermore, the 777 features larger windows than those on many other aircraft thus enhancing passenger experience. The style of these windows, i.e. more rounded, was later adopted on aircraft like the 767-400ER and 747-8. The spacious cabin also provides crew rest areas located in the crown area above the cabin. Separate crew rests can be included for both flight and cabin crew, with a two-person crew rest above the forward cabin between the first and second doors, and a larger overhead crew rest further aft with multiple bunks.
 
Engines
Three engines manufacturers developed more efficient and quieter turbofans to power the 777, and all have been selected by Boeing's customers. Pratt & Whitney offers the PW4000 series of engines, General Electric offers its GE90 series, and Rolls-Royce offers the Trent 800 series of engines. All available engines offer excellent fuel efficiency, while at the same time allow the 777 to be even more quiet than a 767, even though the engines powering the 777 provide 40 per cent more power. Key factors in this performance are new, larger-diameter fans with wide-chord fan blade designs and bypass ratios ranging from six-to-one to as high as nine-to-one
 
Boeing 777 Versions

Boeing 777-200
Boeing 777-200 Information
The Boeing 777-200 is the base-line model of the 777. The first aircraft was delivered to United Airlines in May 1995. The aircraft was build by Boeing's non-destructive testing campaign in 94' - 95', and provided valuable knowledge for the later 777 programs.
 
Boeing 777-200ER
Boeing 777-200ER Information
The Boeing 777-200ER was taken into service in 1997, roughly two years after the first 777 was delivered to United Airlines. It featured increased fuel capacity as well as more powerful engines. ER stands for Extended Range as the -200ER is able to fly significantly farther than the -200. The first airframe was delivered to British Airways.
 
Boeing 777-200LR
Boeing 777-200LR Information
The Boeing 777-200LR (Longer Range) entered service in 2006 and became the world's longest range commercial airliner. The -200LR, also known as Worldliner, is able to connect almost any two citypairs in the world. It is capable of flying 9.450 nautical miles within a time span of 18 hours. The first airframe was delivered to launch customer Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) on February 26, 2006.
 
Boeing 777-300
Boeing 777-300 Information
The Boeing 777-300 was originally designed as a replacement for the 747-100 and -200 aircraft. It features a 33 feet fuselage stretch over the baseline 777-200 and allows for up to 550 passengers in a single class cabin configuration. The first aircraft was put into service by Cathay Pacific in June, 1998.
 
Boeing 777-300ER
Boeing 777-300ER Information
The Boeing 777-300ER (Extended Range) is the longer range version of the Boeing 777-300. It contains many modifications, including the most powerful engines ever produced, the GE90-115B. The aircraft is also equipped with raked wingtips, additional fuel tanks, strengthened main landing gear and fuselage and a higher Maximum Take-off Weight (MTOW). The first aircraft was delivered to Air France on April 29, 2004